Posted in Becoming a Writer

Becoming a writer – It hangs on a balance

If you are anything like me you wear several hats, so to speak, throughout the day.  Being a writer is just a small part of who I am.  Personally, I like it that way, but I would like to see writing play a bit larger role in my life than it currently does.

For years I’ve tried to balance writing and creativity into my life.  It’s an extremely difficult if not impossible process.  Every time I made more time for writing, I neglected something else; things like the dishes, laundry, cooking [which is something I enjoy], even reading started taking a back burner or became neglected to make room for writing.  I tried schedules, blocked out time, took time off from work and I even took the summer off from school, so I could dedicate time for writing.  For many these approaches work, but for me it created stress and depleted my motivation and creativity.

So, for the last few months I have sat relatively unmotivated waiting for inspiration to strike.  Though, this time wasn’t wasted.  I have spent the last two months journaling and speaking with a life coach.  And some where along this journey, I discovered something amazing…  I don’t need a balance of work, life, and writing as I always thought.  I discovered that I needed to integrate it into my life.  In the past, I always tried to balance my different roles.  Now I am changing and integrating them into my day.

So, what does that look like?

It means instead trying set aside time for writing, I have changed my perspective and now I am squeezing writing in.  I know it sounds the same, but for me it’s a completely different thought process.  For example, instead of setting time aside to write this post after  I get off work,  I worked on this post off and on all day.  I have been stealing a few minutes of downtime here and there and re-purposing it to writing.  I’ll snatch a minute of time that equates to a sentence or two, while I wait for a report to generate.  Or I’m waiting for the water to boil when I’m making spaghetti, so during that time I’ll read a few pages in a book or I’ll make a couple notes about an idea for my book, or even write a bit.

For me the real balance has been snatching those little unnoticed pockets of time and turning them to something enjoyable.  It’s amazing what little changes accomplish.  In the past couple weeks, I have noticed small moments of downtime at work that had been filled w/ checking social media or starting at the screen waiting for a report to generate.  I have stolen those moments and read a few lines in a book, wrote a sentence or two on my book, worked on other creative ideas, or even typed a blog post.  And the amazing thing is I’m making progress, feel more creative, and have even started working on new and different [painting and drawing] creative ventures.  And I’m spending more of my free time being creative than before.

How do you balance your schedules?  Do you schedule creative time?  Or do you steal it?20160322_161339.jpg

 

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Author:

I am a writer currently working on her first series featuring Malcolm Stone. I also dabble in photography cooking and enjoying life. Synopsis of Dissonance (Book I in the series): Malcolm is youngest son of Preston Stone, the largest liquor importer on the east coast since the prohibition. His family’s affluence has afforded him the opportunity to follow his passion of being a pianist. He married a successful local artist Anabelle Connolly. They appeared to have the perfect life, but it had turned sour. After Anabelle’s death, the truth of their marriage can no longer be hidden. Years of Malcolm’s carefully constructed lies start unraveling at his feet. Will he be able to pick up the pieces of his shattered life? Dissonance explores and exposes a violent relationship, infidelity, substance abuse, depression, and lies.

5 thoughts on “Becoming a writer – It hangs on a balance

  1. Lately, I’ve been very busy, so it’s hard to fit in time and writing. Usually, at the end of the day, I’ll set aside 30 minutes for writing and 30 minutes for reading. On the weekend, I have more time, around like an hour for each.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m the same way. I tried to schedule time for writing, but in between being a dad, having two jobs, and being a chauffeur, writing was never an option. So I “steal” time for writing. I have a journaling and note-taking apps on my phone specifically for that purpose. I’ll usually write on my breaks, and make notes on Evernote whenever something hits me.

    I tried the balancing act, and it doesn’t work for me. A lot of people may chalk it up to being undisciplined. And that’s fine. I just know that setting a time to write however many words or pages a day is maddening. So I do what I can to get in whatever writing I can.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My life isn’t as stressed with task lists like so many have. I made writing the main focus of my life for five days each week. Housecleaning is something I do to get out of this chair for a few minutes. The housework gets done but not all in one shot. My home always looks as if it was cleans about two days ago. Some tasks are ingrained in me so they do get done no matter what. Just don’t look at the windows, window sills, or the tops of furniture in the bedrooms.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I read this post when you published it and didn’t have time to comment, but this series of posts is really helping me reflect on what I want as a writer / creative / human being and I really appreciate it.

    For me, the balance is that there is no balance. I am a creative. My work is my life and my life is my work, and I am 100% happy with that. What helped me to find this non-balance is that when I gave myself a ‘day off’ and said ‘I can do anything I want to do today’… most of the time I wanted to write or paint or take myself on an artist’s date!

    What I do want / need to change are the number of things on my to-do lists. Admin feels like a whole ‘nother job and I’m looking for ways to manage this better.

    Like

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